Mental Health issues in the workplace

It’s World Mental Health Day on 10th October (today).

1 in 4 of us will experience mental health problems this year.

Consider Jane’s story. She is a Marketing Manager at a Retail Bank . She was known by her colleagues as an energetic team member contributing great marketing ideas frequently in monthly leadership meetings. Over the past few months, her direct managers and team mates noticed that Jane was very quiet in meetings with very little to share. Some colleagues noticed that she appeared very tired and agitated at work. During morning coffee breaks, she had commented privately that she was feeling stuck at work. Jane had also lost her temper several times at team meetings, which was out of her character.  Her direct manager realized that Jane may be burning out under pressure in the workplace.

Having a work colleague, friend, or family member supporting you can make all the difference. So, if someone you know is acting differently, step in.

The theme is ‘mental health in the workplace’ and we’re supporting Time to Change, a growing movement that’s changing how we all think and act about mental health.

It’s easy to dismiss mental health problems as something that only affects others. But, with 1 in 4 people experiencing mental health problems every year, it can happen to any of us – a work colleague, friend, or member of the family.

Without support from others, people with mental health problems can lose what they care about most. It’s a time when you need your colleagues, friends, and family more than ever. So, remember, if someone you know is acting differently, step in.

You don’t have to be an expert to be supportive. It can be as simple as checking in with someone, asking them how they’re doing, listening and not judging, just being there and being yourself. Time to Change is run by Mind and Rethink Mental Illness, and thousands of companies like us are joining to help make change happen.

Joe’s career transition story

“The only way to make sense out of change is to plunge into it, move with it, and join the dance.” – Alan Watts

For the first time in 20 years, Joe is officially unemployed, having ample free time to reflect and ponder on the next move in his career and life. Joe had always been in the corporate world, working for several financial services companies in London and Asia. He was working long hours, and never quite happy with his job, but the money income was good. Due to a corporate re-organization, his job role in Singapore was moved to London unexpectedly and he found himself out of a job for the first time in his entire career journey.

A Reinventing Process (Ibarra, 2004) unfolded before him. He looked at alternative career paths leading to different possibilities in industries outside of his comfort zone and explored “Whom he might Become?”. Joe conducted small experiments with different companies, speaking with insiders from different industries, attending career discussions and interviews, and tried on different identities during the process. Eventually, he used the time to set up his own business entity in Singapore specializing in Career Transitions Coaching. This in itself is a small experiment to test the market in Singapore and the Southeast Asia region to see if his observations, hypotheses on client targets and demand is accurate or requiring further refinement. Joe also linked up with several liked minded friends who would be interested to partner with him on his new business adventure.

Joe feels revitalized, rejuvenated, healthier and happier. He is ready to embark on his new life journey.

*All personal identification details have been altered to maintain confidentiality.